Success can be a double-edged sword. Just ask anyone who’s invested a great deal of time and skill in building a career in a challenging technical niche.

Technology Talent Economy Vs Talent Economics

Yes, highly skilled professionals, especially technology professionals effectively position themselves above their competition. It takes less persuasion to justify the premium on their consulting fee. And they create a healthy distance between themselves and others aspiring to meet that premium.

Highly skilled technical consultants are also spoil for choice, so to speak. They’re never short of project offers and tend to move effortlessly from one project to the next.
That’s the good side. But there’s a bad side too, and it has to do with the traditional economics that rule the tech-talent industry, or any industry for that matter: The economics of supply and demand.

The ‘supply’ of technical experts is limited in the world, making them scarce, and raising demand. Their demand is limited (niche skills, remember)? But scarcity means that demand is seen as high. Simply put, when quantity is limited, price must shift to meet the quantity. To get the technical consultant of your choice, you must offer the price that will meet the supply.

That’s one way of obtaining market equilibrium. But in the long run, (and that’s when we take a ‘macro’ picture of the talent economy), aggregate supply becomes inelastic. In techie-terms, that means, that the supply of talent will not respond to changes in supply. It becomes ‘fixed’. Raising prices won’t guarantee the desired quantity of technical consultants. So what will?

The End Of Career Stalls And Skill Short Sell

That’s where a funny and tragic thing happens: Technical consultants are forced to lower their price in order to compete in areas with greater demand. In other words, their niche skills now command the same (or only a slightly higher price), than common, mass-market, easy to acquire skills. It is now harder to justify the premium on consulting fees. What’s happened here? Top talent has been forced to commoditize itself, only because it couldn’t get the job its top-notch skills deserved.

We’re on a mission to fight this commodification. We believe top talent deserves top opportunity. And that highly skilled technology professionals should never have to short sell themselves.

This mission reflects extensively within Xperti’s product architecture. We don’t want the best talent in the technology industry to waste time deleting irrelevant job posts in their inbox. Nor do we want valuable consulting time being wasted in revising search filters on professional platforms. We don’t want you to subscribe (and then unsubscribe from) newsletters that promise to help your career and do nothing of the sort.

Also ReadSkills and Attitude: For Technology Professionals, They Both Matter

Software Projects: Efficient And Effective Profile Match

Xperti builds on nearly two decades of recruiting analytics to identify, assess and match top professionals with top projects and jobs.

The search techniques applied in Xperti place an emphasis on granular precision. It goes far beyond basic keywords and some core search terms. The location, years of experience, skillset, preferred interest and industry are configured to produce the most accurate profile-project match. In other words, less sorting out and deletions for you, and much more accuracy and timely matches for us.

Work That Matches Your Qualifications

Be on the right side of the talent curve. Get the growth and opportunities your software skills and efforts have earned. Xperti makes it worth your while to earn returns on the efforts you’ve invested in yourself at last.

Author

Nayyara Rahman is a management and technology professional with a focus on digital services. Her work in integrating marketing and technology is aimed at making organizations more efficient, accountable and transparent. She is also an award-winning author and researcher whose contribution has been acknowledged on several prestigious international forums.

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